The Plastic Surgery Foundation
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Grants We Funded

In 2019, The Plastic Surgery Foundation (The PSF) awarded 33 investigator-initiated projects and allocated $891,274 to support the newest, clinically relevant research in plastic surgery.

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons/PSF leadership is committed to continuing to provide high levels of investigator-initiated research support to ensure that plastic surgeons have the needed research resources to be pioneers and innovators in advancing the practice of medicine.

Research Abstracts

Search The PSF database to have easy access to full-text grant abstracts from past PSF-funded research projects 2003 to present. All abstracts are the work of the Principal Investigators and were retrieved from their PSF grant applications. Several different filters may be applied to locate abstracts specific to a particular focus area, or PSF funding mechanism.

Engineering Bone and Cartilage for ASCs and Scaffolds

Principal Investigator
Peter Letourneau MD

Year
2006

Institution
University of Nevada

Funding Mechanism
Basic Research Grant

Focus Area
Tissue Engineering

Abstract
Rabbit adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can be used to generate clinically useful autologous bone and cartilage constructs when seeded on appropriate biocompatible scaffolds. Specific Goals: 1. To generate osteocytes and chondrocytes from rabbit ASCs in vitro on biocompatible tissue scaffolds, both biodegradable and soluble (poly (lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA)), and biodegradable but insoluble (MEDPOR®). 2. To apply the above techniques to an in vivo model through the implantion of cell-impregnated scaffolds in rabbits, and then study the effects of the in vivo microenvironment on the biologic behavior of the implants. This research will provide valuable data on engineering connective tissue constructs from autologous tissue. Our ultimate goal is to extend these techniques to future projects in humans, in order to improve outcomes in patients requiring reconstructive surgery following cancer resection, traumatic injuries, and degenerative diseases.